Schoolchildren in Kenya

Frequently Asked Questions

General

QuickSee is the world’s most accurate handheld autorefractor. Its combination of the open view binocular design, wavefront aberrometry, and dynamic measurements produce clinically accurate autorefraction measurements, in a durable handheld format suitable for use in clinics and in the field. QuickSee is as accurate as the high-end clinical desktop autorefractors and demonstrates excellent agreement with subjective refraction.

The open view binocular design reduces device-induced myopia and accommodation. Patients simply look though QuickSee like a pair of binoculars at a target at least 3-6 meters (~10-20 ft.) away, instead of at a virtual image in a traditional closed view system.

By using wavefront aberrometry to measure refractive error, QuickSee captures information that is unavailable to traditional autorefractors. This additional information enhances vision care professionals’ assessment of what refractive correction is needed, whether by eye surgery or eyeglass prescriptions.

Dynamic measurements enable QuickSee to provide highly confident measurements. Patients’ eyes are relaxed and allowed to function normally, and they don’t require cycloplegia, for precise measurements of refractive error in the eyes’ natural state.

In addition, QuickSee is durable for field use. It can be used in humid and dusty environments and it requires no calibration. The dark eye cups isolate the patient’s eyes from ambient light, helping to control pupil dilation and allowing both indoor and outdoor use. The rubber grips and eye cups can be cleaned using simple alcohol swabs.

QuickSee can be used in both binocular and monocular modes to accommodate for certain eye disease states and/or facial characteristics.

QuickSee is very easy to use. Eye care professionals and healthcare providers can begin performing measurements after 30 minutes of training.

QuickSee is used by eye care professionals and healthcare providers practicing in fully equipped clinics and also in low-resource settings around the world.

Clinics: QuickSee performs the same function as a traditional autorefractor but can be used anywhere, freeing table space and accelerating the objective refraction process.
Optical retailers: QuickSee enables fast, accurate estimation of the patient’s prescription to verify it against their eyeglasses prescription to reduce the need for remakes.
Mobile clinics and vision care missions: QuickSee performs clinically accurate autorefraction measurements for school, nursing/retirement home, patient home visits, office visits, community / population health research, and developing nation / disaster relief service.

QuickSee has been designed for clinical accuracy and field durability. It can withstand frequent travel and is used extensively by NGOs performing vision care missions in underserved communities and in developing countries.

QuickSee measurements are as accurate as those of a desktop autorefractor. Desktop autorefractors measurement range is -25 to +25 diopters; QuickSee covers -10 to +10 diopters, which covers more than 95% of the adult population. QuickSee is within <0.25 D (excellent agreement) and <0.5 D (good agreement) of subjective refraction for 60-70% and 80-90% of adult patients respectively, whereas desktop autorefractors are usually within <0.25 D and <0.5 D of subjective for 50-60% and 80-90% of these patients respectively.

 

QuickSee

Desktop Autorefractor

Study

Agreement with SR ≤0.25D

Agreement with SR ≤0.5D

Agreement with SR ≤0.25D

Agreement with SR ≤0.5D

QuickSee versus Grand Seiko WR-5100K [1]

Non-cycloplegia, adult population

 

SE: 71%

 

SE: 82%

 

SE: 63%

 

SE: 89%

QuickSee versus Nidek ARK-1 [3]

Non-cycloplegia, adult population

SE: 62%

SE: 87%

SE: 54%

SE: 83%

QuickSee versus Topcon KR-8800 [4]

Non-cycloplegia, pediatric population

SE: 43%

SE: 71%

SE: 37.1%

SE: 61.3%

QuickSee versus Topcon KR-8800 [4]

Cycloplegia, pediatric population

SE: 48%

SE: 72%

SE:56 %

SE: 74 %

References to support that the -10D to +10D range covers >95% of the adult population:

  1. Dandona R, Dandona L, Naduvilath TJ, Srinivas M, McCarty CA, Rao GN. Refractive errors in an urban population in Southern India: the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1999;40:2810Y8.
  2. Vitale S, Ellwein L, Cotch MF, Ferris FL 3rd, Sperduto R. Prevalence of refractive error in the United States, 1999-2004. Arch Ophthalmol 2008; 126:1111Y9.
  3. Katie M. Willians et al. Prevalence of refractive error in Europe: the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) Consortium. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015; 30(4): 305–315.
QuickSee training typically takes about 30 minutes. We suggest new users begin by watching our two-minute instruction videos on our website (click here). Also, please refer to our one-page quick start guide that comes with the unit (click here). We encourage new users to practice on about 15 different patients to become familiar with the device itself and with the alignment process. For more information, visit PlenOptika.com/support, or consult the QuickSee user manual.

Please refer to the QuickSee manual (included with purchase, the Quick Start Guide PDF, or to our training videos.

To get accurate measurements quickly, QuickSee must be correctly aligned with the patient’s eyes. For video demonstrating alignment tips, please visit PlenOptika.com/support.

First, compare the distance between QuickSee’s optical channels (the circles you see in the center of the eyecup) with the patient’s pupillary distance (PD). Rotate the dial to adjust the viewports to the patient’s estimated PD.

Next, with QuickSee seated on the patient’s face, check the display to see one or both eye indicators. You may need to make seating, leveling, and PD adjustments to get both eyes in alignment (in binocular measurements) or to get a single eye aligned correctly for monocular measurement. See the video at PlenOptika.com/support for detailed alignment tips.

Direct the patient to look through QuickSee at a target that is distinct and bright, at least 3-6 meters (~10-20 ft.) away. Encourage them to blink at the beginning, middle, and near the end of the 10-second measurement to refresh their tear film and to help relax their eyes, which are important contributors to the refractive state of the eye.

Once QuickSee is aligned to the patient, measurement takes 10 seconds. Experience from the field consistently shows that vision care providers in high throughput environments can measure as many as 30 patients per hour.

PlenOptika has received recognition and development grants from public agencies in the United States, Spain, and India, and has earned recognition for their mission, business strategy, and product design internationally. To see PlenOptika’s grantors and awards visit plenoptika.com/about/

Finalists for International Product Design Award Beazley’s Designs of the Year 2018
Essilor’s See Change, Grand Jury Prize
Clearly Vision
American Society of Mechanical Engineering ISHOW Winner
SmartFIFTY – one of India’s Top 50 social impact startups
MIT $100k Finalist

…Plus many others

QuickSee applications

QuickSee was designed to deliver clinically accurate autorefraction anywhere. QuickSee is: Simple: QuickSee is easy to learn, easy to use, and patient-friendly Training takes about 30 minutes It can be used by specialists working under appropriate supervision No accessories needed—no vision chart or projector High throughput—as many as 30 patients per hour Handheld and battery powered: Easy to take and use anywhere; can be used up to 8 hours continuously, and it can be operated while tethered for charging. Equally effective indoors and outside: The dark eye cups protect the patients’ eyes from ambient light allowing for indoor and or outdoor use. There is no need to control the light in the measurement environment. Durable and calibration free: QuickSee was designed to withstand the rigors of global health missions. It is dust- and moisture-resistant. Its optical system requires no ongoing calibration, a feature validated in demanding healthcare environments around the world. It is easily cleaned with ordinary alcohol swabs. QuickSee ships travel-ready in a hardened carrying case.
Because QuickSee is the world’s most accurate handheld autorefractor, it is perfectly suited to deliver high quality care to patients anywhere. QuickSee benefits in mobile vision care: Clinical quality measurements Durable and calibration free High throughput: as many as 30 patients per hour Operates in humid and dusty environments Not sensitive to ambient light Can be used indoors and outdoors Includes a hardened carrying case QuickSee can be used to replace your retinoscope, desktop autorefractor, or pediatric vision screener. QuickSee can be used in: School and workplace vision outreach Nursing and retirement home visits Private home visits Community health initiatives NGO/mission-driven vision programs in developing countries

QuickSee can function as a primary or secondary autorefractor in an optical clinic. Clinics considering the purchase of a second autorefractor should consider QuickSee because it: 

  • Provides accurate autorefraction anywhere: Use QuickSee on patients that require a refraction without needing K values (including simple follow-up exams, post-op checkups, and/or over-refraction). These measurements can be done directly in the exam room next to the phoropter or in other locations including a pre-test room and retail space.
  • Creates space for new medical diagnostic instruments: QuickSee can be used to change workflow away from a dedicated test-room to make space for larger revenue generating medical diagnostic equipment like an OCT or a fundus imager.
  • Enables fast, accurate screening in the retail store: QuickSee enables fast, accurate estimation of the patient’s prescription conveniently in the retail space to verify it against their eyeglasses prescription to reduce the need for remakes.
  • Enables better service for your special needs patients: QuickSee is perfectly suited for patients who can’t comfortably access a desktop autorefractor because they are wheelchair bound or have limited mobility.
  • Improves refraction efficiency: QuickSee can solve bottlenecks around an existing autorefractor if multiple patients are often waiting in line

QuickSee is perfectly suited for serving patients who can’t easily visit a clinic. QuickSee in this setting can be used to provide comprehensive or refractive eye exams, or to perform quantitative objective vision screening. Many elderly patients have limited mobility and measurements can be performed even when patients are bed/or wheelchair bound. If the patient is physically weak, the technician can easily hold QuickSee to assist during the measurement.

QuickSee is an ideal autorefractor for elderly patients as it can be brought to the patient whether in a wheelchair or bed, takes an easy objective measurement (removes the need for patient compliance) in under a minute. Additionally, QuickSee’s monocular mode is helpful to measuring patients where facial/eye asymmetry may be present. For instance, if they have a cataract in one eye, the other eye can be easily measured with QuickSee.

QuickSee is a handheld wavefront autorefractor, that it is battery operated and is ideal in a school setting; QuickSee has been clinically validated on children aged 3 to 16 years old (click here to see paper) and demonstrated to have better accuracy with and without cycloplegia than a high-end desktop autorefractor. Children find QuickSee intuitive and fun to hold, and the objective measurement ensures accurate screening for refractive errors by avoiding the need for patient feedback and compliance common in school vision screening practices. Perform quantitative objective vision screening, bringing the device to the student and not vice versa
  • Objective quantitative measurement reduces cheating by children as they sometimes want to avoid getting glasses they need—or to get glasses they don’t need
  • Provides the nurse confidence when referring the student to an optometrist or ophthalmologist
  • Given the high throughput more students can be measured
  • Device can be shared within a school or within a school district
  • Device works in any lighting condition, is robust and calibration free
QuickSee’s clinical accuracy and ease of use make it perfect for rapid post-op and followup vision measurement. Please contact us if you have any specific questions or would like to receive more information.

Technical

QuickSee is the world’s most accurate handheld autorefractor. Its combination of the open view binocular design, wavefront aberrometry, and dynamic measurements produce clinically accurate autorefraction measurements, in a durable handheld format suitable for use in clinics and in the field. Published studies have demonstrated QuickSee is as accurate as high-end desktop autorefractors and is within 0.5 D of subjective refraction on 80-90% of patients (summary data from multiple studies conducted in the USA, Spain, and India)..

The open view binocular design reduces device-induced myopia and accommodation because both eyes are “seeing” the same visual field, so physiologically they are getting the same light levels and focusing on the same target during the measurement. Patients simply look though QuickSee like a pair of binoculars at a target at least 3-6 meters (~10-20 ft.) away, instead of at a virtual image in a traditional closed view system.

By using wavefront aberrometry to measure refractive error, QuickSee captures information that is unavailable to traditional autorefractors. This additional information enhances vision care professionals’ assessment of what refractive correction is needed, whether by eye surgery or eyeglass prescriptions.

QuickSee produces results with high confidence because it makes dynamic measurements of the patient’s eyes in their natural state, even allowing for the tear film to be refreshed by blinking during the measurement.

The dark eye cups isolate the patient’s eyes from ambient light, helping to control pupil dilation and allowing both indoor and outdoor use.

QuickSee can be used in both binocular and monocular modes to accommodate for certain eye disease states and/or facial characteristics.

QuickSee can hold more than 10,000 patient logs, keeping track of all measurements taken for each eye of a given patient. Patient logs can be downloaded and QuickSee companion app will output the patient data into an Excel file. To maintain HIPAA compliance and patient privacy, QuickSee does not incorporate the patient name or other identifiable information. Additionally, PlenOptika cannot access clinical data from any QuickSee system.

QuickSee app is available for Android devices and will be shortly available on Apple iOS.

At present, QuickSee device is connectable via Bluetooth to a thermal printer as well as to an Android phone with the free QuickSee Companion App (available in the Google Play Store). QuickSee Companion App allows you to update QuickSee device’s firmware if needed, and it will allow you to download patient data into an Excel file. End of the summer 2019 the iOS App will be available. If you have any specific connectivity request please contact us.

QuickSee has an average battery life of 6 to 8 hours allowing for approximately 200 to 270 patient measurements per charge. It can be operated while tethered for charging. The unit can operate in 220/110V environments. The internal battery can be swapped out by PlenOptika’s service technicians.

QuickSee comes with a standard one-year warranty that covers manufacturing defects. Given the sophisticated technology and the factory calibration requirements for the optical components the unit is not designed to be field repairable. PlenOptika and our distributors offer a hot swap program to ensure that vision care providers have reduced downtime in the case of a technical issue.

QuickSee specification sheet can be accessed here: US / International

The optical design of the PlenOptika’s Wavefront Refraction System is calibration free – a feature which specifically designed and validated in tough global health environments around the world. All QuickSees go through a rigorous quality control protocol during production in our world class, FDA audited manufacturing facility. In addition, QuickSee only provides a reading if it passes the internal quality metrics. QuickSee only starts a measurement when the eye is in position with the internal optics – this ensures that the device is seated on the face correctly.

Regulatory

Yes, QuickSee is an FDA Class I, 510(k) exempt medical device. By the end of September 2019 PlenOptika expects CE Mark approval for QuickSee. In addition, our distributors are ensuring that we meet local regulations.

Yes. Because QuickSee is handheld and patient-friendly it is perfectly suited for serving patients who can’t easily visit a clinic or be examined with a desktop autorefractor, such as those who are homebound, wheelchair bound, and even in bed. QuickSee qualifies for a federal tax credit; speak to your accountant about Sections 44 and 190 of the IRS Code for details.

Medical performance

Study

Comment on the study

# Patients

(age Range)

Main Conclusions

1

Objective: Evaluate the base technology of the QS in adults

Device: Monocular, first prototype version

Methods: Compare the accuracy of the device with a high-end desktop autorefractor and with Subjective refraction.

41

(26.4±9.7 years)

  • It is possible to build an autorefractor that is portable, affordable, and robust using low-cost components and no moving parts.
  • A prototype version of the QS technology is as accurate as a high-end commercial autorefractor in predicting refraction of an adult population

2

Objective: To assess the quality of eyeglass prescriptions provided by a QS prototype operated by a minimally trained technician in a low-resource setting.

Device: Monocular, 2nd prototype version

Methods: Visual acuity (VA) and patient preference were compared between trial lenses set to two eyeglass prescriptions from (1) the QS prototype autorefractor operated by a minimally trained technician and (2) subjective refraction by an experienced refractionist

708

(35±13 years)

  • Eyeglass prescriptions can be accurately measured by a minimally trained technician using a low-cost wavefront autorefractor in rural India.
  • Data from 708 participants indicate a marginal difference in both prescription preference and resulting visual acuity between eyeglasses derived from subjective refraction versus QS autorefraction (VA from QS was on average only one letter worse).
  • Among the 438 participants 40 years old and younger, there was no statistically significant difference in the preferences for eyeglasses derived from subjective refraction versus QS autorefraction.
  1. N. J. Durr et al., “Design and Clinical Evaluation of a Handheld Wavefront AutorefractorOptom. Vis. Sci., vol. 92, no. 12, pp. 1140–1147, Dec. 2015.
  2. N. J. Durr, S. R. Dave, D. Lim, S. Joseph, T. D. Ravilla, and E. Lage, “Quality of eyeglass prescriptions from a low-cost wavefront autorefractor evaluated in rural India: results of a 708-participant field studyBMJ Open Ophthalmol., vol. 4, no. 1, p. e000225, Jun. 2019.

QuickSee provides the same accuracy as a desktop autorefractor. Desktop autorefractors measurement range is -25 to +25 diopters; QuickSee device covers -10 to +10 diopters, which addresses the needs of over 95 % of adult population. QuickSee is within < 0.25 D (excellent agreement) and < 0.5 D (good agreement) of subjective refraction for 60-70% and 80-90% of adult patients, respectively, whereas desktop autorefractors are usually within <0.25 D and < 0.5 D of subjective for 50-60% and 80-90% of these patients, respectively.

References to support that the -10 to 10 range covers > 95% of the adult population:

  • Dandona R, Dandona L, Naduvilath TJ, Srinivas M, McCarty CA, Rao GN. Refractive errors in an urban population in Southern India: the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 1999;40:2810Y8.
  • Vitale S, Ellwein L, Cotch MF, Ferris FL 3rd, Sperduto R. Prevalence of refractive error in the United States, 1999-2004. Arch Ophthalmol 2008; 126:1111Y9.
  • Katie M. Willians et al. Prevalence of refractive error in Europe: the European Eye Epidemiology (E3) Consortium. Eur J Epidemiol. 2015; 30(4): 305–315.

Wavefront aberrometry provides refractive measurements by assessing both lower- and higher-order aberrations. It captures additional refractive information that is unavailable to traditional autorefractors. This additional information provides an enhanced view of what refractive correction is needed, whether it comes in the form of eye surgery or eyeglass prescriptions.

Wavefront aberrometry enables more measurements of the eye’s refractive errors to be taken, and with higher precision than traditional autorefractor technology, thereby resulting in a more accurate autorefraction measurements.Wavefront aberrometry technology currently used in conjunction with LASIK costs more than $40,000 USD. PlenOptika’s innovative, patented engineering and design makes wavefront aberrometry accessible for general optometric practice in clinics, retail stores, and even mobile care.

QuickSee is suitable for all kinds of patients from age five years and up. QuickSee allows the clinician to operate the device in binocular and/or monocular mode at the click of a button. Certain conditions (such as facial asymmetry or eye conditions like cataract) can make binocular measurement difficult, in which cases monocular measurement is recommended. For binocular measurements, aligning QuickSee device can be difficult in patients with strabismus, amblyopia, phoria, or drooping eyelids. In these cases, we suggest taking monocular measurements.

The binocular open view allows the patient to view a distant target, thereby reducing accommodation.

Not at this time. We recommend using a device specifically designed to measure K-values.

Yes, QuickSee allows you quickly and easily check if your patients refractive error has changed from their contact lens prescription. Vision care providers can check if their patients have their right power for their eye without having them take their contact lenses off.

Yes. Contact lenses that are the correct prescription will neutralize the patient’s refractive errors, and that neutralization will be detected in QuickSee’s measurements. Vision care providers can check if their patients have their right power for their eye without having them take their contact lenses off.

QuickSee could over-minus a prescription if the patient is over-accommodating or over-focusing. This tends to happen with younger patients. Those over 40, and especially those over 80, don’t accommodate much anymore. Some optometrists have found that QuickSee actually may under-minus patients. To assist a patient who is over-accommodating, encourage the patient to blink during the measurement and to fixate on and describe a distant target. When the measurement is taken again, the prescription reading will be more accurate.

Whether the patient has myopia, hyperopia, or astigmatism, QuickSee provides accurate measurements within its measurement range. For astigmatism, the measurement range is 0 to -6 D of cylinder.

Of course. Amblyopia is a subjective measurement of what the patient sees, and QuickSee is an objective device. If a patient, for example, is plano in the left eye, meaning they have perfect vision, and a plus-five in the right eye, that patient will in all likelihood be amblyopic. The brain’s going to suppress the imagery from that weaker eye: the plus five in the right eye. If you were to use QuickSee that produced a dead-on accurate reading on that patient, QuickSee would show that the left eye is plano and that the right eye is plus-five. You would still receive the objective measurement, but QuickSee will not tell you that the patient has amblyopia. Patients with amblyopia should be measured in monocular mode.

QuickSee measures high order aberrations, but at this time does not display them. We are still collecting clinical data before we release this feature.

QuickSee can take measurements in patients with strabismus but it may be more challenging. QuickSee can be used in binocular or monocular mode. With strabismic patients, however, you will almost always need to test in monocular mode. By definition, depending on the severity of the strabismus, one of the eyes is going to be misaligned. The misaligned eye will not be looking straight ahead, and as a result, you may not be able to get a measurement on that eye.

Patients with high refractive errors typically benefit from having subjective refraction given that autorefractor errors are quite high for this patient population. Quicksee, as a wavefront autorefractor also suffers from higher errors in this population, in line with even the best autorefractors in the market.

We don’t have an answer at this time as we have do not have any clinical data yet.

If the cataract is small, QuickSee should be able to measure the refractive errors accurately. If the cataract blocks much of the signal (see the spot diagram in monocular mode) then it is likely QuickSee will not be able to measure the refractive efforts.

The minimal pupil size is 2 mm. QuickSee does not require dilation but works accurately for dilated eyes.

QuickSee device can be difficult in patients with strabismus, amblyopia, phoria, or drooping eyelids. In these cases, we suggest taking monocular measurements.

QuickSee’s binocular design ensures that both eyes are “seeing” the same visual field so that both eyes receive the same levels of light and are able to focus on the same target during the measurement, resulting in both pupils behaving similarly. The open view design enables the patient to relax their accommodation by looking through the device (similar to a pair of binoculars) at a distant target instead of at a virtual image that is used in a traditional closed view system (which can cause accommodation or device induced myopia). Overall, QuickSee’s binocular open view design is similar to clinical standard of binocular distance vision testing, and makes the measurement more accurate.

In addition, an incidental benefit of the binocular mode is higher throughput as both eyes are being measured at the same time

In comparison, devices that measure one eye at a time typically suffer from low accuracy because each eye experiences different vision conditions that can induce accommodation or pupil size changes. Since QuickSee has a binocular open view design that ensures the same visual experience for both eyes in either binocular or monocular measurement mode, thus avoiding the challenges faced by other devices.