Stack of journals

Publications

Peer-reviewed articles and abstracts

Validation of an Affordable Handheld Wavefront Autorefractor

Rubio, Marcos, et al. “Validation of an Affordable Handheld Wavefront Autorefractor” Optom. Vis. Sci., vol. 96, no. 10, pp. 726–732, Oct. 2019.

Key findings

Visual acuity resulting from correction based on QuickSee measurements was the same as that achieved by subjective refraction in 87% of the eyes. This improvement in visual acuity is comparable to that reported for clinically established benchtop systems.

Agreement between the three refraction components (M, J0, J45) provided by QuickSee and subjective refraction is within 0.5 D in more than 85 % of the cases.

This research suggests that QuickSee provides measurements that agree more closely with subjective refraction than other handheld autorefractors.

PLOS One logo

Comparing low-cost handheld autorefractors: A practical approach to measuring refraction in low-resource settings

Agarwal A, Bloom DE, deLuise VP, Lubet A, Murali K, Sastry SM (2019) Comparing low-cost handheld autorefractors: A practical approach to measuring refraction in low-resource settings. PLoS ONE 14(10): e0219501.

Key findings

Refractive error can be accurately measured using affordable and handheld devices

Pre-production QuickSee prototype outperformed Retinomax and Netra portable autorefractors

QuickSee was found most accurate compared to subjective refraction, and suitable for epidemiological screening and as a diagnostic tool

Design and Clinical Evaluation of a Handheld Wavefront Autorefractor

N. J. Durr, et al. “Design and Clinical Evaluation of a Handheld Wavefront Autorefractor” Optom. Vis. Sci., vol. 92, no. 12, pp. 1140–1147, Dec. 2015.

Key findings

It is possible to build an autorefractor that is portable, affordable, and robust using low-cost components and no moving parts.

A prototype version of the QS technology is as accurate as a high-end commercial autorefractor in predicting refraction of an adult population

Quality of eyeglass prescriptions from a low-cost wavefront autorefractor evaluated in rural India: results of a 708-participant field study.

Durr NJ, Dave SR, Lim D, et al. Quality of eyeglass prescriptions from a low-cost wavefront autorefractor evaluated in rural India: results of a 708-participant field study. BMJ Open Ophthalmology 2019;4:e000225. doi:10.1136/ bmjophth-2018-000225

Key findings

Eyeglass prescriptions can be accurately measured by a minimally trained technician using a low-cost wavefront autorefractor in rural India.

Data from 708 participants indicate a marginal difference in both prescription preference and resulting visual acuity between eyeglasses derived from subjective refraction versus QuickSee autorefraction (VA from QuickSee was on average only one eye chart letter worse).

Among the 438 participants 40 years old and younger, there was no statistically significant difference in the preferences for eyeglasses derived from subjective refraction versus QuickSee autorefraction.

Visual acuity evaluation with refractions prescribed by a novel low-cost wavefront aberrometer

E. Lage, et al. “Visual acuity evaluation with refractions prescribed by a novel low-cost wavefront aberrometer” Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci., 2015, vol. 56, p. 3570.

Annual review of
Biomedical Engineering

Tackling the Global Burden of Uncorrected Refractive Errors

N. J. Durr, et al. From Unseen to Seen: Tackling the Global Burden of Uncorrected Refractive Errors. Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 16:131-153, Jul. 2014

References

Carlos Hernández:
Eye Health Hero 2020

Carlos Hernandez with QuickSee handheld autorefractor

We’re thrilled to announce the IAPB named our Director of Engineering Carlos Hernández an Eye Health Hero for 2020!